Many Labs 3: Evaluating participant pool quality across the academic semester via replication  /

Observe, hypothesize, test, repeat: Luttrell, Petty, and Xu (2017) demonstrate good science

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Description: Many Labs 3 (Ebersole et al., 2016) failed to replicate a classic finding from the Elaboration Likelihood Model of persuasion (Cacioppo, Petty, & Morris, 1983; Study 1). Petty and Cacioppo (2016) noted possible limitations of the Many Labs 3 replication (Ebersole et al., 2016) based on the cumulative literature. Luttrell, Petty, and Xu (2017) subjected some of those possible limitations to empirical test. They observed that a revised protocol obtained evidence consistent with the original finding that the Many Labs 3 protocol did not. This observe-hypothesize-test sequence is a model for scientific inquiry and critique. To test whether these results advance replicability and knowledge transfer, we conducted direct replications of Luttrell et al. in nine locations (Total N = 1,219). We successfully replicated the interaction of need for cognition and argument quality on persuasion using Luttrell et al.’s optimal design (albeit with a much smaller effect size; p < .001; f2 = .025, 95%CI [.006, .056]) but failed to replicate the interaction that indicated that Luttrell et al.’s optimal protocol performed better than the Many Labs 3 protocol (p = .135, pseudo R2 = .002). Nevertheless, pragmatically, we favor the Luttrell et al. protocol with large samples for future research using this paradigm.

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Study Description Luttrell, Petty, and Xu (2016) reran a replication from Many Labs 3 (Ebersole et al., 2016) which they deemed to be suboptimal for investigating the effect of interest. They reran a version of the study similar to that which was used in Many Labs 3 and an improved version. They observed the original effect in the optimal version, but not in the Many Labs 3 version. In this study,...

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