Elevation & Prevalence of Prosociality

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Description: Our early work on elevation heavily depended on one stimulus to elicit elevation. In this series of studies we systematically vary the eliciting stimuli, focusing on theoretically-relevant types of cues pertaining to the prevalence of prosociality in the local environment. We originally called this line of work "boundary conditions of elevation" or "cues studies." These data are associated with two different but related reports: These studies are called Studies 13 to 15 in "Elevation, an emotion for prosocial contagion, is experienced more strongly by those with greater expectations of the cooperativeness of others" Other aspects of the data are the focus of "Does observing reciprocity or exploitation affect elevation, a mechanism driving prosociality?" https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/evolutionary-human-sciences/article/does-observing-reciprocity-or-exploitation-affect-elevation-a-mechanism-driving-prosociality/A50E7E5331AB638951F5993380CACCDC

License: CC0 1.0 Universal

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Components

  • Study1

    Do different stimuli elicit different levels of the emotion elevation?

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  • Study 2

    Replicate and extend Study 1

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  • Study 3

    replicate and extend studies 1 and 2

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  • Data and Code


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