Tocci, G. 2019. “Territori, turismo e lentezza: percorsi slow di sviluppo sostenibile”. Open Journal of Humanities 1: 475-498.

Contributors:
  1. Giovanni Tocci

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Category: Communication

Description: In postmodern society, speed has increasingly affirmed itself as synonymous of efficiency, capacity and competence. As result, this rapidity has produced a growing gap between a slow world and one more and more fast, with negative consequences on the environment and especially on the wellbeing of people. On the other hand, slowness has gradually established itself as a kind of manifesto which opposes the dominant system of values and reaffirms the importance of other dimensions of life in addition to labour and productivity. In this perspective, the study focuses on the set of “slow” practices aimed at enhancing territories and implementing sustainable development models, also in connection with tourism. For this purpose some Italian slow cities’ experiences are taken into consideration.

License: CC-By Attribution 4.0 International

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In postmodern society, speed has increasingly affirmed itself as synonymous of efficiency, capacity and competence. As result, this rapidity has produced a growing gap between a slow world and one more and more fast, with negative consequences on the environment and especially on the wellbeing of people. On the other hand, slowness has gradually established itself as a kind of manifesto which oppo...

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