Self-Citation and Gender

Contributors:
  1. Carl T. Bergstrom
  2. Shelley Correll
  3. Jennifer Jacquet

Date created: | Last Updated:

: DOI | ARK

Creating DOI. Please wait...

Create DOI

Category: Project

Description: How common is self-citation in scholarly publication and does the practice vary by gender? Using novel methods and a dataset of 1.5 million research papers in the scholarly database JSTOR published between 1779-2011, we find that nearly 10% of references are self-citations by a paper's authors. We further find that over the years between 1779-2011, men cite their own papers 56% more than women do. In the last two decades, men self-cite 70% more than women. Women are also more than ten percentage points more likely than men to not cite their own previous work at all. Despite increased representation of women in academia, this gender gap in self-citation rates has remained stable over the last 50 years. We break down self-citation patterns by academic field and number of authors, and comment on potential mechanisms behind these observations. These findings have important implications for scholarly visibility and likely consequences for academic careers.

Files

Loading files...

Citation

Components

  • Stata Code

    King, Bergstrom, West & 2 more

    Recent Activity

    Loading logs...

  • Bibliography

    King, West, Correll & 1 more

    Recent Activity

    Loading logs...

  • Figures

    King, Bergstrom, West & 2 more

    Recent Activity

    Loading logs...

  • Men Set Their Own Cites High: Gender and Self-citation across Fields and over Time

    King, Bergstrom, Correll & 2 more
    How common is self-citation in scholarly publication, and does the practice vary by gender? Using novel methods and a data set of 1.5 million research...

    Recent Activity

    Loading logs...

Recent Activity

Loading logs...

OSF does not support the use of Internet Explorer. For optimal performance, please switch to another browser.
Accept
This website relies on cookies to help provide a better user experience. By clicking Accept or continuing to use the site, you agree. For more information, see our Privacy Policy and information on cookie use.
Accept
×

Start managing your projects on the OSF today.

Free and easy to use, the Open Science Framework supports the entire research lifecycle: planning, execution, reporting, archiving, and discovery.