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<p><strong>Project outline for 2013_6</strong></p> <p><em>Keywords: psych verbs; emotion verbs; trials of the heart; Mandarin</em></p> <hr> <p><strong>Overview:</strong> Subjects determined who, if anyone, was at fault for specific emotional events. Follow-up to 2010_2. In that experiment, tested 50 verbs, but many turned out not to be emotion verbs. Re-doing with only emotion verbs listed in Mandarin VerbNet. 16 verbs (8 of each type) were tested in both experiments, allowing for some replication.</p> <p><strong>Publications:</strong></p> <p>Hartshorne, O'Donnell, Sudo, Uruwashi, Lee, and Snedeker (in press). Psych verbs, the Linking Problem, and the Acquisition of Language. Data for Exp. 7.</p> <p><strong>Team:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Joshua Hartshorne</li> <li>Jesse Snedeker</li> </ol> <p><strong>Data Collection:</strong></p> <p>March 2013, in Taiwan at National Tsing Hua University</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p><strong>Stimuli:</strong> 25 ES and 25 EO verbs. Chose emotion verbs from Mandarin VerbNet which in my own list are listed as transitive and as "the experiencer must experience" -- with the exception of one subject-experiencer verb, since there were only 24 otherwise. Since there were more than 25 available EO verbs, excluded additional verbs that were tested in 2010_2. Note that 8/25 verbs of each type were tested in 2010_2. Made first list by randomizing order so that never more than 3 ES or EO verbs in a row. List 2 is same list, but with subjects and objects reversed. Lists 3 and 4 are Lists 1 and 2 in reverse order. Unlike in 2010_2, no names were re-used across trials.</p> <p><strong>Procedure:</strong> Unlike 2010_2, the order of possible responses was subj, obj, neither. This was done to make it more like the English version.</p> <p><strong>Notes:</strong></p> <p>Thanks owed to Yi-Ching Su (NTHU), who allowed her students to be tested.</p>
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