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<p><img alt="Graphical Abstract" src="https://files.osf.io/v1/resources/9mc8b/providers/osfstorage/5e297befc19c5d0031ee1343?mode=render"></p> <p><em>Figure from NeuroImage manuscript <a href="http://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2020.116527" rel="nofollow">doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2020.116527</a> (CC-BY-NC-ND)</em></p> <hr> <p>In this study, we used electroencephalography (EEG) to capture brain responses of young adults while viewing real-life video messages about risky alcohol use. The health messages varied in perceived effectiveness ("Strong"/"Weak").</p> <ul> <li> <p>We found that strong, more effective messages prompted enhanced inter-subject correlation (ISC) of EEG data.</p> </li> <li> <p>Differential EEG-ISC effects were observed during free viewing and a perceived message effectiveness rating task.</p> </li> <li> <p>In a second stream of analyses, EEG-ISC is used to model fMRI signal captured in a second audience (Imhof et al., 2017) viewing the same messages.</p> </li> </ul> <p>Contact: Martin.Imhof@uni<a href="http://-konstanz.de" rel="nofollow">-konstanz.de</a></p> <hr> <p>The file repository contains data to reproduce results and figures from the manuscript.</p> <p>Contents: - EEG-ISC data from correlated components analysis - Average EEG-ISC during strong & weak alcohol prevention videos (Fig. 2b) - Average EEG-ISC resolved for a free viewing task and a perceived effectiveness rating task (Fig. 2c)</p> <ul> <li> <p>4 non-thresholded result maps of an EEG-ISC informed fMRI-GLM analysis in which BOLD signal tracked with the ISC from correlated EEG components (<em>t</em>-values). Please note that the maps shown in Fig. 3 and Fig. 4a of the manuscript are thresholded using FWE correction, <em>p</em> &lt; 0.05, Threshold: +/- 6.08, Talairach space.</p> </li> <li> <p>2 result maps visualizing fMRI-ISC results taken from Imhof et al. (2017) overlaid onto the same anatomical voxel space (<em>r</em>-values, Talairach space). Please note that the maps shown in Fig. 4b are FDR corrected with <em>q</em> = 10^-4 and a threshold for <em>r</em>'s &gt; 0.1.</p> </li> </ul> <hr> <p>More information and related work can be found here:</p> <p><a href="https://gpbp.uni-konstanz.de/people-page/martin-imhof" rel="nofollow">https://gpbp.uni-konstanz.de/people-page/martin-imhof</a></p> <p><a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2020.116527" rel="nofollow">https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2020.116527</a></p> <p><a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsx044" rel="nofollow">https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsx044</a></p> <p><a href="https://nomcomm.github.io/" rel="nofollow">https://nomcomm.github.io/</a></p> <hr> <p>Imhof, M. A., Schmälzle, R., Renner, B., & Schupp, H. T. (in press) Strong health messages increase audience brain coupling. <em>NeuroImage</em>. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2020.116527</p>
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