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<h1>Tips and Tricks:</h1> <h3>Writing outreach emails:</h3> <ol> <li>Keep the researcher's needs central to the message.</li> <li>Save them time by keeping the message short and too the point.</li> <li>If you are making an inquiry, whenever possible, lead with your carefully phrased question. Explain the context second.</li> </ol> <h3>Preparing for consultations:</h3> <ol> <li>Prepare relevant, open ended questions (based on the following steps).</li> <li>Read up on their area of research (at least the ready-reference materials), so that you can write and ask informed questions.</li> <li>If there is a manual, grant, or published article regarding the work they are doing, read it.</li> <li>Brush up on your vocabulary in their field, so that you can use their words instead of librarian jargon.</li> </ol> <h3>Providing support</h3> <ol> <li>Be prepared to ask questions of the experts as appropriate.</li> <li>Remember that you are providing a skilled service to <em>support a need</em> — This work should be professional and mutually beneficial.</li> <li>Be flexible — the support the researcher needs may not match your expectations.</li> <li>Be prepared to say "yes" or "no" as appropriate.</li> <li>Remember relationship building is continuous.</li> <li>Once you understand their needs, unless they can be resolved on the spot, schedule another meeting, so that you have time to prepare to present them with possible solutions. E.g. at the second meeting you might demo the OSF using a project fitting their research description.</li> <li></li> </ol>
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