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The DLF Assessment Interest Group Content Reuse Working Group is developing tools and documentation to better assess the reuse of digital objects. This is particularly of relevance to Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums, Repositories (GLAMR) practitioners since there are no established definitions, standards, or common practices for the assessment of digital object reuse. This presentation will focus on two resources currently under development: the impact assessment matrix and ethical guidelines for assessing reuse. The matrix helps practitioners to define and position activities along a use-reuse spectrum. Presenters will provide an overview of the matrix, both unpacking the distinctions between use and reuse and their various instances as well as highlighting the areas of continued debate. The ethical guidelines propose a set of core values, principles, and guidelines for the application of this assessment in a manner that accounts for the cares of GLAMR and stakeholder communities and the collections that they steward. Presenters will introduce the most current iteration of the ethical guidelines and discuss how practitioners can use it to develop more ethical, considerate assessment practices. Arguing that both the matrix and the ethical guidelines are needed to effectively and equitably assess use and reuse, the presenters will conclude the talk by articulating how the the two resources begin to address the lack of standards and common practices as well as by situating these outputs in the larger work of their IMLS-funded project “Digital Content Reuse Assessment Framework Toolkit.”
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