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<p><strong>References</strong></p> <p>Alvares, G. A., Quintana, D. S., & Whitehouse, A. J. (2017). Beyond the hype and hope: critical considerations for intranasal oxytocin research in autism spectrum disorder. <em>Autism Research</em>, 10(1), 25-41.</p> <p>Insel, T. R. (2016). Translating oxytocin neuroscience to the clinic: a National Institute of Mental Health perspective. <em>Biological Psychiatry</em>, 79(3), 153-154.</p> <p>Quintana, D. S., Westlye, L. T., Rustan, Ø. G., Tesli, N., Poppy, C. L., Smevik, H., ... & Djupesland, P. G. (2015). Low-dose oxytocin delivered intranasally with Breath Powered device affects social-cognitive behavior: a randomized four-way crossover trial with nasal cavity dimension assessment. <em>Translational Psychiatry</em>, 5(7), e602.</p> <p>Quintana, D. S., Westlye, L. T., Alnæs, D., Kaufmann, T., Mahmoud, R. A., Smerud, K. T., ... & Andreassen, O. A. (2019). Low-dose intranasal oxytocin delivered with Breath Powered device modulates pupil diameter and amygdala activity: a randomized controlled pupillometry and fMRI study. <em>Neuropsychopharmacology</em>, 44(2), 306.</p> <p>Quintana, D. S., Westlye, L. T., Alnæs, D., Rustan, Ø. G., Kaufmann, T., Smerud, K. T., ... & Andreassen, O. A. (2016). Low dose intranasal oxytocin delivered with Breath Powered device dampens amygdala response to emotional stimuli: A peripheral effect-controlled within-subjects randomized dose-response fMRI trial. <em>Psychoneuroendocrinology</em>, 69, 180-188.</p> <p>Quintana, D. S., Westlye, L. T., Hope, S., Nærland, T., Elvsåshagen, T., Dørum, E., ... & Stensønes, E. (2017). Dose-dependent social-cognitive effects of intranasal oxytocin delivered with novel Breath Powered device in adults with autism spectrum disorder: a randomized placebo-controlled double-blind crossover trial. <em>Translational Psychiatry</em>, 7(5), e1136.</p> <p>Jurek, B., & Neumann, I. D. (2018). The oxytocin receptor: from intracellular signaling to behavior. <em>Physiological Reviews</em>, 98(3), 1805-1908.</p> <p>Keebaugh, A. C., & Young, L. J. (2011). Increasing oxytocin receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens of pre-pubertal female prairie voles enhances alloparental responsiveness and partner preference formation as adults. <em>Hormones and Behavior</em>, 60(5), 498-504.</p> <p>Quintana, D. S., Rokicki, J., van der Meer, D., Alnæs, D., Kaufmann, T., Córdova-Palomera, A., ... & Westlye, L. T. (2019). Oxytocin pathway gene networks in the human brain. <em>Nature Communication</em>s, 10.</p> <p>Yarkoni, T., Poldrack, R. A., Nichols, T. E., Van Essen, D. C., & Wager, T. D. (2011). Large-scale automated synthesis of human functional neuroimaging data. <em>Nature Methods</em>, 8(8), 665.</p>
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