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<p><strong>Title</strong>: "Understanding the Self across cognitive domains"</p> <p><strong>Authors and affiliations</strong>: Letizia Amodeo (1,3), Roeljan Wiersema (1,3), Marcel Brass (2,3), Annabel Nijhof (1,3)</p> <p>(1) Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University</p> <p>(2) Department of Experimental Psychology, Ghent University</p> <p>(3) EXPLORA, Ghent University</p> <p><strong>Abstract</strong>: "Perceiving ourselves as unified is fundamental to psychological functioning and may influence how the surrounding environment is processed. The so-called “egocentric/self-bias” – advantaged processing for self-relevant stimuli – is believed to foster social competence. Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) experience persistent social difficulties, which may relate to an atypical sense of self. However, research findings are still inconsistent: several studies suggested a reduced or absent self-bias in ASD, whereas others did not observe differences in self-processing between individuals with ASD and neurotypicals. Moreover, research is lacking in exploring self-biases across different cognitive domains: distinct self-related aspects have been studied separately so far, and self-biases magnitude has been mostly assessed within cognitive domains. Therefore, the goal of the present study is to investigate self-biases across perception, memory and attention, by comparing three well-established self-processing measures, i.e., the shape-label matching task (perceptual domain), the trait adjectives task (memory domain), and the visual search task (attentional domain), within the same experimental procedure. We intend to explore whether self-biases in the different cognitive domains are related, emerging as a result of a common, underlying mechanism, or instead consist in distinct, unrelated effects. Furthermore, associations with ASD symptomatology (10-item AQ, SRS-A) as well as self-consciousness (SCS-R) will be examined."</p>
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