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<p>Matlab data and scripts necessary to reproduce Figures 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 and all Tables reported in Ester, Sutterer, Serences, & Awh, J Neurosci 2016. Imaging data used to produce Figures 3 and 5 have been omitted due to space limitations, but can be requested from E. Ester (edward.ester01@gmail.com).</p> <p><strong>Description:</strong> 18 volunteers participated in a single two-hour scanning session. In separate blocks participants attended either the orientation ("oriTask") or luminance ("lumTask") of a peripherial grating to detect oddball targets. Image reconstruction techniques (inverted encoding model; IEM) and searchlight analyses were used to examine representations of stimulus orientation in retinotopically organized subregions of visual cortex (V1, V2v, V3v, hV4v) and local neighborhoods containing a robust representation of stimulus orientation (see Figures 3-4 and Table 1) or neighborhoods containing a representation of task set (i.e., attend orientation vs. luminance; see Figures 5-6 and Table 2). </p> <p><em>See README file included in archive for more information.</em></p> <p><strong>Paper citation</strong>: Ester, E.F., Sutterer, D.W., Serences, J.T., Awh, E. (in press) Feature-selective attentional modulations in human frontoparietal cortex. <em>J Neurosci</em>.</p> <p><strong>Usage</strong>: This OSF project contains the data and analysis scripts for the experiment reported in our J Neurosci paper. If you would like to use the data in published work, please cite both the paper and data set, and email me.</p> <p>Questions/Comments/Data Requests: edward.ester01@gmail.com</p>
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