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<p>Compensatory lengthening (CL) has traditionally been observed to be a purely local phenomenon, with the trigger and target segments being either adjacent to one another or separated by only one syllable boundary. In this talk, I present evidence from Estonian showing that CL can be long-distance (LD) as well, and provide an account that allows for LDCL while explaining its crosslinguistic rarity, as follows. If CL takes place, it is mediated by a constraint punishing the crossing of association lines (<em>CROSS), which enforces pure locality in CL. In Estonian, constraints forbidding unstressed long vowels (</em>VV) and geminates (<em>GEM) outrank </em>CROSS; morae are thus prohibited from landing in intermediate positions, and must travel longer distances to find a new home. LDCL is rare, then, because it only exists in languages that first enforce CL over mora deletion, and second, possess constraints that force LDCL over local CL.</p> <p>(There are two versions; the one labeled "no transitions" has one page per slide, the other has separate pages for each new bullet point.</p> <p>Live sessions will be hosted over zoom at the following address and dates / times:</p> <p><a href="https://stanford.zoom.us/j/2324731851" rel="nofollow">https://stanford.zoom.us/j/2324731851</a></p> <p>April 8th : 15:00 - 17:00</p> <p>April 14th : 16:00 - 18:00</p> <p>April 17th : 16:00 - 18:00)</p>
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