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<p>INTRODUCTION</p> <p>This project attempted to replicate Elliot et al. (2010) in collaboration with the Collaboration Replication and Education Project (CREP). The two-way experimental design examined the influence of seeing the color red on volunteers’ perceptions/appraisals of others. Female undergraduate volunteers, self-identifying as heterosexual, were recruited. Participants were randomly assigned to view a photograph of man with a red or grey background for 10 seconds. Volunteers then completed surveys to rate the man’s physical attractiveness, sexual desirability, extraversion, likability agreeableness, and status/power.</p> <p>PARTICIPANTS</p> <p>For this study, we recruited one-hundred and seventy-five (N = 175), non-color blind, heterosexual female students who were 18 years-of-age or older (M = 19.92, SD = 1.38). Racial / ethnic make-up of the sample was as follows: African American (8.3%), Asian / East Indian / Pacific Islander (18.3%), Caucasian (9.3%), Hispanic / Latino (54.4%), Native American (0.5%), Multi-Ethnic (6.2%), and Other (3.1%). Participants were recruited for this research through the university’s Research Participation System (SONA) system and were compensated with course credit for particiaption. </p> <p>STUDY DESIGN</p> <p>This was a two-way experimental design. The primary independent variable IV of interest was the color of the border each participant would see (i.e., red or grey) when viewing and appraising a photograph of a man. The secondary IVs of interest were the participants’ ethnicity and relationship status (i.e., casually dating, committed relationship, married, divorced, and single). The research assistants who administer the protocol were blind to the each volunteer’s IV conditions </p> <p>Dependent variable indices were derived from volunteers’ responses to surveys, based on appraisals of the photographs, on a gray or red background. Dependent variables of interest included volunteers’ ratings of the attractiveness, sexual desirability, personality, social status, and emotional stability of the man in the photograph. </p> <p>MATERIALS & MEASURES</p> <p>The photographs of the man with gray or red backgrounds, that were used in this study were provided by CREP.</p> <p>A standard laptop computer with a 16-inch screen, running Windows 8, was used to present ratings questions to volunteers. Per CREP standards, volunteers were tested in a room devoid of the color red. Research assistants physical attire & make-up, room décor, all physical and digital displays on the laptop were all carefully screened for red. All other CREP standards (e.g., room lighting, etc.), also were adhered to. </p> <p>First Impression Questionnaire (1st 11 is Study 3): These 11 items were presented first, immediately after volunteers were exposed to the manipulation. The item presentation was randomized. </p> <ol> <li>How attractive do you think this person is? (1= Not at all attractive, 9= Extremely attractive)</li> <li>If I were to meet the person in this picture face to face, I would think he is attractive. (1= No, definitely not; 9= Yes, definitely)</li> <li>How pleasant is this person to look at? (1= Not at all, 9= Very much)</li> <li>Would you want to date this person? (1= No, definitely not, 9= Yes, definitely)</li> <li>Would you want to kiss this person? (1= No, definitely not, 9= Yes, definitely)</li> <li>How happy do you think this person is? (1= Not at all happy, 9= Very happy)</li> <li>How honest do you think this person is? (1= Not at all honest, 9= Very honest)</li> <li>How nice do you think this person is? (1= Not at all nice, 9= Very nice)</li> <li>How smart do you think this person is? (1= Not at all smart, 9= Very smart)</li> <li>How friendly do you think this person is? (1= Not at all friendly, 9= Very friendly)</li> <li>How much do you think you would like this person if you got to know him? (1= Not at all, 9= Very much)</li> </ol> <p>These following 14 items were presented second, after each volunteer had a chance to respond to the first 11 items. This item presentation also was randomized.</p> <ol> <li>How attractive do you think this person’s face is? (1= Not at all attractive, 9= Extremely attractive)</li> <li>How attractive do you think this person’s body is? (1= Not at all attractive, 9= Extremely attractive)</li> <li>How attractive do you think this person is overall? (1= Not at all attractive, 9= Extremely attractive)</li> <li>How would you describe this person’s physical appeal? (1= Very low, 9= Very high)</li> <li>Would you want to “make out” with this person? (1= No, definitely not; 9= Yes, definitely)</li> <li>How easygoing do you think this person is? (1= Not at all easygoing, 9= Very easygoing)</li> <li>How understanding do you think this person is? (1= Not at all understanding, 9= Very understanding)</li> <li>Would you want to have sexual intercourse with this person? (1= No, definitely not, 9= Yes, definitely)</li> <li>How high in status do you think this person is? (1= Not at all high, 9= Very high)</li> <li>How much power do you think this person has? (1= None at all, 9= Very much)</li> <li>How would you describe this person’s emotional stability? (1= Emotionally Unstable, 9= Emotionally Stable)</li> <li>Would you want to leave your current partner for this person? (1= No, definitely not; 9= Yes, definitely) What if this person does not have a current partner?</li> <li>I think that this person has the potential to have a great deal of status. (1= Not at all, 9= Very much)</li> <li>I think that this person has the potential to have a high social position. (1= Not at all, 9= Very much)</li> <li>I think that this person has the potential to have high earnings. (1= Not at all, 9= Very much) </li> <li>I think this person has the potential to have a great deal of success. (1= Not at all, 9= Very much)</li> <li>How well do the following statements describe this person: a. He is the life of the party. (1= Not at all, 9= Very well) b. He does not talk a lot. (1= Not at all, 9= Very well) c. He talks to a lot of different people at parties. (1= Not at all, 9= Very well) d. He keeps to the background. (1= Not at all, 9= Very well)</li> </ol> <p>Demographic data and manipulation check were administered last. We asked participants for answers to the following questions, without randomization.</p> <p>Demographic Questions 1. Age (In years and months) 2. Ethnicity (Options include: African American, Caucasian, Asian/ Pacific Islander, East Indian, Latino/ Hispanic, Native American, Multi-ethnic, and/or other) 3. Relationship Status: (casually dating, committed relationship, married, divorced, and single) 4. Sexual Orientation: (Options include: Heterosexual, Homosexual, Bisexual, other, or prefer not to answer) 5. Years of school completed: (Options include: 12 years [College Freshman], 13 years [College Sophomore], 14 years [College Junior], 15 years [College Senior], 16 years [Super Senior], or +16 years)</p> <pre class="highlight"><code>Screening Questions</code></pre> <p>We asked the following questions as a manipulation check. 1. What did you think the purpose of this study is? (Write-in answer) 2. Are you red-green colorblind? (Yes or No)</p> <p>PROCEDURE</p> <p>Once written consent was obtained, the experimenter sat the participant in a comfortable chair, in front of a computer. Volunteers were falsely told they would engage in a task designed to gauge their first impression of another person, based on a photograph. But in actuality, they engaged in an experiment designed to manipulate their impressions / appraisals, by exposing them to the color red.</p> <p>Participants, with the experimenter by their side, read task directions from the computer screen. Once the experimenter confirmed that volunteers understood the instructions, the experimental task began. Volunteers were shown ONE of two photographs of a man. These photos differed only in the color of their background (red versus grey). </p> <p>Participants were then asked to respond to a survey rating the attractiveness, sexual desirability, personality, social status, and emotional stability of the man in the photo. At this time, the experimenter left the area where the experiment was being conducted to prevent viewing of volunteers’ responses. The experimenter remained nearby, and was available during and after the experiment to address any concerns the participants had.</p> <p>Next, participants were asked to provide some demographic information, including data about their sexual orientation. They were also asked to describe what they thought the study was supposedly about, and if they were colorblind.</p> <p>Lastly, participants were debriefed and given a sheet of paper with the senior researchers’ information on it as well as extra resources to learn more about this study. </p> <p>RESULTS</p> <p>Data collected in Spring 2015 has been uploaded to OSF. However, it remains appsword protected. Contact page creaeter directly to obtain password.</p>
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