Effects of cross-cutting exposure on political discussion

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Description: Cross-cutting exposure (i.e., the exposure to dissonant views) is a central component of political discussion among citizens. Although political discussion is a crucial form of political engagement and a well-known source of dissonance, little is known about the impact of cross-cuttingness (vs. like-mindedness; CCLM) elicited by media news on political discussion. In the present pre-registered online experiment (N = 725), news stories were manipulated to induce CCLM and investigate its positive effect on political discussion via a specific path: deliberative thinking and the repertoire of arguments. Although no total effect of CCLM on participating in a political discussion (operationalized as discussion intent) was found, a structural equation model showed specific indirect positive effects via our hypothesized paths. Our study therefore lends support to the positive democratic implication of cross-cutting exposure.

License: CC-By Attribution 4.0 International

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**Full paper** The final article appeared ahead of print as an open-access article in Political Behavior. Please cite as: Schneider, F. M., & Weinmann, C. (2021). In need of the devil’s advocate? The impact of cross-cutting exposure on political discussion. Political Behavior. Advance online publication. [https://doi.org/10.1007/s11109-021-09706-w][1] Online Appendices Online appendices to the f...

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