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<p>Corresponding author: David Moreau d.moreau@auckland.ac.nz</p> <p>Guarantor: Edward Chou ccho594@aucklanduni.ac.nz</p> <p>This repository contains files relevant to the meta analysis titled "<em>The Acute Effect of High-Intensity Exercise on Executive Function: A Meta-Analysis</em>".</p> <p>The <strong>Main Analyses</strong> folder contains the final <a href="https://osf.io/pdwmz/" rel="nofollow">data file</a> from which we ran our analyses (data.csv), and the <a href="https://osf.io/pg53m/" rel="nofollow">R code</a> for running these analyses. Note that:</p> <ul> <li>The data and R script should be in the same folder.</li> <li>In the data file, the n1, m1, sd1 columns correspond to the sample size, mean score, and standard deviation of the score for the high-intensity exercise group, and the n2, m2, sd2 columns correspond to the statistics for the comparison group (either a lower-intensity exercise group, or a resting group).</li> <li>In the R file, there are several options to run different types of analyses. By default, the program removes outlier effect sizes with residuals &gt; 3x the mean residual, outputs a data file, and plots high-quality forest and funnel plot(s). <em>The code will need to be modified should the nature of the data to be analyzed changes.</em></li> </ul> <p>The <strong>Supplemental Material</strong> folder contains other files relevant to this meta-analysis. The <a href="https://osf.io/w43gn/" rel="nofollow">Readme file</a> describes each of these in detail.</p>
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