Right hemisphere damage and everyday conversation

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Description: Damage to the right hemisphere of the brain during adulthood causes problems for cognition and communication. We are currently at an early stage of knowledge with regard to the nature of communication disorders caused by right hemisphere damage, and in delineating their specific implications for communication in everyday life. This project explores how right hemisphere damage affects everyday conversations. It aims to provide detailed descriptions of the behavioural manifestations of communication problems caused by right hemisphere damage, which will support improved speech pathology diagnosis and intervention for this condition. This project received funding from a Macquarie University Research Development / Seeding Grant. The investigators for this project are Dr Scott Barnes (CI), Professor Lyndsey Nickels, Associate Professor Suzanne Beeke, Associate Professor Steven Bloch, Professor Wendy Best, and Ms Sophie Toocaram.

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This project has a number of sub-projects. The details for each sub-project will be added as they progress. Sub-projects will also be updated as further data and findings become available. The first sub-project addresses "response mobilisation" in conversation. Please click here for further details. The second sub-project addresses "other-initiation of repair" in conversation. Please click here fo...

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