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Dan and James answer a listener question on how to navigate open science practices, such as preprints and open code repositories, in light of double-blind reviews. Stuff they cover: - How common is double-blind review? - How many journals don’t accept preprints? - Bias in the review process - How practical is blinded review? - Do the benefits of preprints outweighs not having blinded review? - James' approach to getting comments on his preprints - Convincing your supervisor to adopt open science practices - The preprint that James won’t submit for publication, for some reason - We get reviews... - Our first live guest! **Other links** - [Dan on twitter](www.twitter.com/dsquintana) - [James on twitter](www.twitter.com/jamesheathers) - [Everything Hertz on twitter](www.twitter.com/hertzpodcast) - [Everything Hertz on Facebook](www.facebook.com/everythinghertzpodcast/) Music credits: [Lee Rosevere](freemusicarchive.org/music/Lee_Rosevere/) --------------------------------- [Support us on Patreon](https://www.patreon.com/hertzpodcast) and get bonus stuff! - $1 a month or more: Monthly newsletter + Access to behind-the-scenes photos & video via the Patreon app + the the warm feeling you're supporting the show - $5 a month or more: All the stuff you get in the one dollar tier PLUS a bonus mini episode every month (extras + the bits we couldn't include in our regular episodes) --------------------------------- **Episode citation** Quintana, D.S., Heathers, J.A.J. (Hosts). (2019, October 7) "Double-blind peer review vs. Open Science", Everything Hertz [Audio podcast], [DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/7ZPME][1] [1]: https://osf.io/7zpme/
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