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<p>Redford, L. & Ratliff, K.A. Pride and punishment: Entitled people’s self-promoting values motivate hierarchy-restoring retribution</p> <p><strong>Notes:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Only the cleaned dataset is provided because raw data files contain sensitive, confidential information (IP addresses and potentially-identifying demographic information). The data files are SPSS files.</li> <li>For each study, SAS cleaning scripts provide a description of the process by which data were transformed from raw files to the available datasets.The cleaning scripts are SAS files.</li> <li>The experiment files files were used to run the studies on Project Implicit. These can be used as a codebook to understand what items are available in the dataset. Use a text editor to open them (notepad, notepad++, komodo edit).</li> </ul> <p><strong>Abstract:</strong></p> <p>What is the purpose of punishment? The current research shows that for entitled people—those with inflated self-worth—justice is about maintaining societal hierarchies. Entitled people more strongly hold self-enhancing values (power and achievement; Studies 1 and 3). They are also more likely, when thinking about justice for offenders, to adopt a hierarchy-based justice orientation: perceptions that crime threatens hierarchies, motives to restore those hierarchies, and support for retribution (Studies 2 and 3). Further, the relationship of entitlement to justice orientation is mediated by self-enhancing values when entitlement is measured (Study 3) and manipulated (Studies 4, 5 and 6). Together these studies suggest that entitlement—and the resultant preoccupation with one’s status—facilitates a view of justice as a hierarchy-based transaction: one where criminal offenders and their victims exchange power and status. These findings reveal the self-enhancing and hierarchy-focused nature of entitlement, as well as the roots of retribution in concerns about status, power, and hierarchies.</p> <p>Please contact the corresponding author Liz Redford (lizredford at ufl dot edu) with any questions, comments, or requests.</p>
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