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Proxemic cues are used by observers to infer whether two people are interacting, the nature of their relationship, and the valence of their current interaction. Despite the wealth of information conveyed by interpersonal distance, however, little is known about the representation of proxemic cues within the human visual system. Recently, it has been suggested that pairs of upright individuals arranged face-to-face engage configural processing that permits accurate and efficient representation of social interactions. Where observed, configural processing is thought to improve perception of the spatial relations between constituent stimulus elements. If upright, facing dyads engage configural processing, participants should therefore exhibit heightened perceptual sensitivity to changes in interpersonal distance, compared with judgements of inverted or back-to-back arrangements. Across four experiments, we find no evidence for this view. Participants’ sensitivity to changes in interpersonal distance did not differ for face-to-face and back-to-back dyads (Experiments 1 and 2). Similarly, participants’ sensitivity to changes in interpersonal distance did not differ for upright and inverted dyads (Experiments 3 and 4). Participants’ sensitivity to changes in interpersonal distance in the face-to-face and back-to-back conditions correlated strongly, as did their sensitivity to changes in interpersonal distance in the upright and inverted conditions. Together, these findings suggest that the proxemic evaluation of dyads is mediated by a common mechanism irrespective of dyad arrangement or orientation.