Papers  /

207.4 Evaluation of preservation strategies for an interactive, software-based artwork with complex behavior using the case study Horizons (2008) by Geert Mul.

Contributors:
  1. Klaus Rechert
  2. Claudia Roeck

Date created: | Last Updated:

: DOI | ARK

Creating DOI. Please wait...

Create DOI

Category: Communication

Description: In order to preserve software-based art the research community has primarily focused on emulation as a preservation strategy. The University of Freiburg (D) established emulation as a service for memory institutions and research data archiving - a service that is currently used for preserving software-based art. Software mi- gration, which might provide an alternative solution, has been researched for business applications, however less for software- based art. As a very immediate strategy it does not introduce an additional layer of translation and thus does not slow down the performance. This paper investigates to what extent the existing migration options are useful for preserving software-based art and how they compare to the emulation options currently used. What long-term impact do migration and emulation have on a software- based artwork? What maintenance works do they cause? What changes do they induce in the artwork? The impact of migration and emulation as preservation strategies for software-based art is evaluated on the basis of a case study: the software-based artwork Horizons (2008) by Dutch artists Geert Mul. This case study shows that it was necessary to migrate Horizons first before it could be virtualised with sufficient graphics rendering performance. Hence, this paper concludes, that the combination of migration and emulation can be a good solution for graphics intensive works in the mid-term. It is a step in between short-term solutions like migration and long-term solutions like a full-system emulation; the latter only being possible when the speed advantage of the new hardware is large enough. In order to preserve software-based art the research community has primarily focused on emulation as a preservation strategy. The University of Freiburg (D) established emulation as a service for memory institutions and research data archiving - a service that is currently used for preserving software-based art. Software mi- gration, which might provide an alternative solution, has been researched for business applications, however less for software- based art. As a very immediate strategy it does not introduce an additional layer of translation and thus does not slow down the performance. This paper investigates to what extent the existing migration options are useful for preserving software-based art and how they compare to the emulation options currently used. What long-term impact do migration and emulation have on a software- based artwork? What maintenance works do they cause? What changes do they induce in the artwork? The impact of migration and emulation as preservation strategies for software-based art is evaluated on the basis of a case study: the software-based artwork Horizons (2008) by Dutch artists Geert Mul. This case study shows that it was necessary to migrate Horizons first before it could be virtualised with sufficient graphics rendering performance. Hence, this paper concludes, that the combination of migration and emulation can be a good solution for graphics intensive works in the mid-term. It is a step in between short-term solutions like migration and long-term solutions like a full-system emulation; the latter only being possible when the speed advantage of the new hardware is large enough.

License: CC-By Attribution 4.0 International

Files

Loading files...

Citation

Components

  • 207. Digital Art Preservation

    Morfin
    The four papers in Session 207 explore the issues and topics pertaining to the theme of Digital art preservation, including the opportunities and chal...

    Recent Activity

    Loading logs...

Tags

Recent Activity

Loading logs...

OSF does not support the use of Internet Explorer. For optimal performance, please switch to another browser.
Accept
This website relies on cookies to help provide a better user experience. By clicking Accept or continuing to use the site, you agree. For more information, see our Privacy Policy and information on cookie use.
Accept
×

Start managing your projects on the OSF today.

Free and easy to use, the Open Science Framework supports the entire research lifecycle: planning, execution, reporting, archiving, and discovery.